Tamil and Malayali Society’s charity ball to support Tsunami’s victims

Members of the Society at the Ball.
Image: Piriya SuresparanMembers of the Society at the Ball. Image: Piriya Suresparan

The Tamil and Malayali Society, formed just over a year ago, celebrated its first big event last week.

The Aasai Charity Ball was held at the beautiful Chandelier suite in The Assembly Rooms to benefit the Sivan Arul Illam organisation, based in Sri Lanka.

The committee, when deciding on a big event, knew they wanted to do one with charitable intentions. The co-president of the society, Piriya Suresparan, has had the Sivan Arul Illam close to her family for many years.

The Sivan Arul Illam charity was founded after the 2004 Tsunami that destroyed millions of homes in Sri Lanka and then the intense civil war that affected many of the same communities. The charity works towards and rehabilitation of the homes in the north and east of Sri Lanka as well as providing medical support to the elderly and children affected.

All the proceedings from the Friday night ball will go towards this organization to help support their work for the community.

The extravagant evening consisted of a three course meal and entertainment throughout the night, with Jeya Raveendran, a member of the group ‘Gaana Rajas’ that made it Sky 1’s Got to Dance Semi-Finals, opening the night.

Sticking to the theme of fusing cultures, the evening followed with dances to the mix of classical Indian and Bollywood music, along with the folk genre dance form of Gaana that originates from South India. The evening ended on a good note with attendees dancing the night away on the big dance floor of the venue.

The society originally known as the Tamil society of Newcastle University has expanded and have added Malayalis to the mix this year. With South Asia having multiple cultures in itself, the society is a hub for people from south India, Sri Lanka and anyone interested to learn about the Tamil and Malayali culture. The majority of the main committee themselves understand the impact that merge of cultures has, having been born in Asia but living in England for most of their lives. This is their way of combining and honouring the two cultures that they simultaneously are a part of.

This society differentiates itself by having frequent events varying from night out socials and movie nights to cultural events celebrating the colourful traditions. This also helps to appeal to a wider range of audience, bringing people from different cultures together.

Tamil and Malayali society is officially sponsored by Glenmore Property Services, a real estate company based out of London.

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