Fatima Yamaha: Imaginary Lines

There is something very special about the Dutch electronic producer Ban Bron. Under the guise of a project called Fatima Yamaha, he has won my heart over. His debut single, ‘What’s A Girl To Do’, was released in 2004 (when I would have been 11) and gained Fatima Yamaha huge status as a hit maker after DJ’s like Jackmaster played it religiously. This fame allowed it to be reissued by mega-label Dekmantel in 2015.

This one of the many reasons why Fatima Yamaha is such a special producer- his tracks have a longevity that so many electronic producers struggle to retain, and labels genuinely want to save.

his tracks have a longevity that so many electronic producers struggle to retain, and labels genuinely want to save

The album is an acid-house tinged masterpiece embezzled with analogue synth patterns and rippling guitar runs. The intensely catchy hooks in ‘Love Invaders’ adds to the distilled aesthetic which is prevalent throughout the album. While still nurturing analogue sounds of synths, and crafting great dance tracks the album is embedded in a dark synth-pop package.

The more bass-orientated tracks like ‘Sooty Shearwater, King of Migration’ and ‘Borderless II’ are guaranteed dance floor fillers, whereas the title track, ‘Imaginary Lines’ which, despite oozing an 80’s seductive sound, has an inherent darkness to it. By juxtaposing these grey-tinged sludgy italo disco classics with clever melodies and dream sequencing, Fatima Yamaha’s album is as much an emotional record as one invested in fuelling a party.

Imaginary Lines has a self-reflexive quality to it, which is why it’s not your usual electronic album. It’s quirky electronic flavour is why Imaginary Lines one of my favourite albums of the year.

  Grace Herring 

5/5

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