Indian Raga ‘Sound Yoga’ calms listeners

Last Tuesday the Yoga Society hosted a night of Indian Raga music where listeners could relax and unwind before upcoming exams.

‘Sound Yoga’ took place in the Student Union Venue.

A few visitors turned up expecting to see yoga mats spread out on the floor, ready for a night of restful poses and calorie-burning exercises.

Instead they were treated to an intimate evening of live music by a group of talented players.

The Sound Yoga is often mistakenly confused to a physical discipline, while it is a spiritual and calming experience of music.

Mahesh Sharma Bharrath offered the audience sensual violin playing, soothing them with his deep and trilling passages.

Mahesh was accompanied on the Tabalas and Tanpuras – traditional Indian drums and string – and the harp. The idea for the ‘Sound Yoga’ night was born in Greece where the Yoga society went for a week this year.

Sachin Babbar, the president of the Yoga Society, told the Courier how it happened: “When we were in Greece, Mahesh performed the sound yoga for us.

“We wanted to give people an idea of that there is so much more out there for you to explore”

“We were all taken aback, it was so beautiful! We decided it was something we would like to incorporate to the society.

“We wanted to give people an idea of that there is so much more out there for you to explore, to experience.”

He added: “We also wanted to raise a bit of money for the society so that we could be in a church again next year.”

Mahesh describes this experience as ‘a union through soul’, and says it is the easiest among all accessible forms of yoga.   

The music itself comes from a tradition of passing on skills and inspiration, often from teacher to student.

Mahesh said: “Before we go on stage we don’t have rehearsals.

Speaking to the Courier, he admits: “It is difficult because Indian classical music, which is essentially the Sound Yoga, is spontaneous.

“It is not written down. The Sound Yoga is based on the Raga system. It is basically just a scale… a melodic framework that piece would be based on.”

Julien Genev, a member of the Yoga Society, said: “I have seen Mahesh played before. It was just amazing as though from another world.

“When he starts everyone stops and no-one can move.

“This is truly mesmerizing.”

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