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Lothric's Burning, Lothric's Burning

April 25th, 2016 | by NUSU
Lothric's Burning, Lothric's Burning
Gaming
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As someone who generally regards themselves as a casual gamer, choosing to do a review on Dark Souls III probably wasn’t the wisest idea.

The first thing I want to talk about is the different classes available in the game. Choosing between them can be difficult – Souls is punishing even to hardened players, so every advantage you can take is one that you should. After looking through the different classes however, I disregarded all of that and chose to be a Thief because it looked the coolest.

As for the classes themselves, each character has its own strengths and weaknesses. The classic ‘Deprived’ offers little but bragging rights, but other classes provide at least some help for newcomers. Playing to your own strengths will make your first play through a little bit easier. If you thrive at ranged attacks then the Sorcerer is a strong contender, whilst if getting up close and personal suits your style then the Assassin may not be a bad option.

I was able to competently beat down the first handful of enemies, although my overuse of the roll and back step buttons left my character looking like a member of a 90’s boy band.

Feeling like I was on top of the world, I then wandered into a large open area, which to the best of my knowledge seemed enemy-free. I strutted confidently over to the doors on the other side to move onto to the next zone… and that’s about the time where I remembered that I was playing Dark Souls III.

The doors were locked, and although the area seemed open, in the middle sat a stone statue, impaled by a large sword. It was at this point that the large open area seemed to look more like a large enclosed arena and my first boss battle would be officially about to begin.

“I strutted confidently over to the doors on the other side to move onto to the next zone… and that’s about the time where I remembered that I was playing Dark Souls III.”

However, the game adds a deeper level of difficulty, much like its predecessors. The bosses have a tendency to mutate. They evolve. This means that just when you think  you’ve finally worked out exactly when and where to strike, the enemy you think you have beaten begins to play a whole different game.

And that is what makes this game so easy to fall in love with. It keeps you guessing when you think you’ve finally sussed it. It’s frustrating and you may need to take out insurance on everything within arms reach of your playing space, but it’s clever at being frustrating, and that’s why it’s brilliant.

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