Tyneside Cinema Show and Tell Event

Image Credit: Tyneside Cinema

Trust me, this Show and Tell is infinitely better than the ones you’d get in primary school. The aforementioned is a free monthly event run by our beloved Tyneside Cinema, aimed at students and upcoming artists to showcase their work – whether it’s a work in progress, or an almost finished piece, you have the chance to get your work displayed on the big screen, and then get feedback from audience members and, more crucially, professionals working in the arts sector.

The event is held in The Gallery, the Tyneside’s smallest screen room of just 33 seats. The size however offers an intimate environment to display these types of exhibitions – it’s formal enough to make you feel like you’ve hit the big time, but never to the point where it’s overwhelming.

First up was Cat Auburn, a Northumbria University graduate who showcased test footage as part of her ‘Preparing the Ground’ project; “It’s basically like doing a sketch before a painting”, she remarked during the discussion that followed the screening. Each clip focussed on the impact of editing and contrapuntal music, with one experimenting with close-up and overhead shots of a Zen garden in Glasgow, all whilst a drone hummed loudly in the background. I also never thought I’d find watching a tractor doing circles inside the Vienna Spanish Riding School to Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker soundtrack so mesmerising, but it’s surprisingly cathartic. Further locations for the project will include New Zealand and Kyoto, examining the impact of globalisation – watch this space.

“If you’re a film student wanting more than just Turnitin feedback, Show and Tell is worth taking a look at”

Next up were three short films commissioned by Random Acts Network Centre North, a partnership programme between Arts Council England and Channel Four. The group selects 24 projects from 16-25 year olds each year, offering the facilities, training and production support to create short films that can potentially be aired on the latter. The first film, Door to Door Poet by Matt Miller, features, as the title suggests, a performance poet going to people’s homes in Newcastle and offering to write poetry about their lives. Only one man accepts the offer, and it’s a truly witty and charming exchange – a stunning lyrical examination of our modern day fears of boundaries and intimacy. Secondly, Matt Pickering’s In A State Of presented an architecture-inspired visual representation of our anxieties about hospitals. The recent Fine Art Newcastle graduate expertly captures the clinical coldness of the NHS, with a gradual build-up of agonising ambient noise all whilst a patient stands shivering on a set of concrete stairs engulfed by plastic sheets. Perhaps not wholly accurate, but definitely the most aesthetically creative of the films on show. Finally, Lizzie Klotz’s To Suit focussed on an interpretive dance sequence in the woods that represented human mating rituals. It certainly raised the most eyebrows in the audience, however I am in no place to criticise any kind of dancing, believe me. The quirky choreography and natural cinematography aptly match the central duo’s charming, yet fleeting, encounter.

And so, the evening came to a close, and I couldn’t recommend it enough. If you’re looking for artistic inspiration, or are a film student wanting more than just Turnitin feedback, Show and Tell is definitely worth taking a look at.

The next event will be held on 25th January 2017 at 6pm; if you would like to present your work, get in touch with the Tyneside via filmschool@tynesidecinema.co.uk, or book a free audience ticket by phoning the box office on 0191 227 5500.

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